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a_half

The great publication Human Parts published an essay of mine called “Stuff,” which asks: When you break up with somebody, do you have to break up with the things they left behind, too?

I keep the little things. Movie stubs, silly notes, tchotchkes. Post-it doodles. Quarter toys in their gumball machine eggs. They mean something different — they aren’t attached to any holiday, or any obligation. They’re just, Hey, I was thinking about you.

Read “Stuff” on Human Parts

a_half

New piece up on Medium about, well, stuff.

You hold onto stuff from your exes, right? Serious exes, I mean. Girlfriends, boyfriends, relationships. But not serious stuff, necessarily. Not Valentine’s Day and Christmas and birthday presents. Those are the things you sort of have to keep. It’s in the social contract, I think.

I’m talking about the little things. I keep the little things. Movie stubs, silly notes, tchotchkes. Post-it doodles. Quarter toys in their gumball machine eggs. They mean something different — they aren’t attached to any holiday, or any obligation. They’re just, Hey, I was thinking about you.

Read “Stuff” on Medium

CONNECTED

I don’t doubt that the couple in the booth,
who are both looking at their phones
instead of talking to each other,
are totally in love.

They’re taking pictures of their food
so they can remember this date
when they’re old and gray,
looking at their Facebook timelines.

They will think back on the meal,
and the looks they shared between status updates,
and the number of likes they got,
and smile.

Call me a romantic.

Driftmoon screenshot / Instant Kingdom

I haven’t played Driftmoon yet, but the RPG earned great acclaim since it was released earlier this year. Polygon has a great piece about the story behind the game – the story of married co-creators Ville and Anne Mönkkönen and how they came to work on the daunting project together:

This is a love story. It’s a tale about two people who meet, fall in love, share their lives and — through the seven-year making of a video game — find that the unique qualities which separate them as individuals are just as important as that which binds them together.

“A Game Development Love Story” by Colin Campbell